Difference between revisions of "Spence, R.: Information Visualization - Design for Interaction (2nd Edition), Pearson Education, 2006"

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[[Image:Spence 2006 information-visualization.jpg|thumb|150px|left|[Pearson, 2006] ]]
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Totally cool visualization. Question:How are the boxes orerded? I am guessing, by gross revenue, but how did you decide whether to order the wider boxes on the bottom and to the right and the tall skinnier ones to the left and at the top?Thanks,Elliot
 
 
<b>Type:</b> Book/Hardback<br>
 
<b>Author:</b> [[Spence, Robert|Robert Spence]]<br>
 
<b>Pages:</b> 304<br>
 
<b>Publisher:</b> Pearson Education<br>
 
<b>Publication Date:</b> December 2006<br>
 
 
 
{{Quotation|Fully revised textbook on the rapidly growing field of Information Visualization. Its emphasis is on real-world examples and applications of computer-generated and interactive visualization.  Information visualization deals with representing concepts and data in a meaningful way. Depending on the medium used, information can be visualized in either static (e.g. a graph on a printed page) or dynamic forms. This book is appropriate for courses in information visualization, human-computer interaction, interaction design, and computer graphics.|[Pearson, 2006]}}
 
 
 
 
 
''Features instructor resources including PowerPoint files with a wealth of images and diagrams taken from the book, and a collection of useful short video clips''
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
{{ISBN|0132065509}}
 
 
 
== Table of Contents ==
 
*''Dedication''
 
*''About the author''
 
*''Other books by the author''
 
*Preface
 
*Acknowledgements
 
 
 
*Chapter 1    What is Visualization?
 
**Visualization
 
**Computational support
 
**The Human User
 
**The value of Information Visualization
 
***Fraud; silicon chips; pharmaceuticals
 
**Questions of Taxonomy
 
**Issues
 
**References
 
**Exercises
 
 
 
*Chapter 2    The Issues
 
**The task
 
**Nature of the problem
 
**The data
 
**Table presentation
 
**Bargrams
 
**Interactive object selection
 
**Overview
 
**Multiple attributes
 
**Detail
 
**Significant objects
 
**Interactive attribute selection
 
**Space limitations
 
**Filtering
 
**Taking stock
 
**Navigational guidance
 
**Movement in information space
 
**Perception and interpretation
 
**Summary
 
**References
 
**Exercises
 
 
 
*Chapter 3    Representation
 
**Data types
 
**Data complexity
 
**Perception and Cognition
 
 
 
**3.1    Encoding of value
 
***Univariate data
 
****A single number; a collection of numbers
 
***Bivariate data
 
***Trivariate data
 
****Scatterplot matrix
 
****Preattentive processing- things that ‘pop out’; choice of encoding
 
***Hypervariate data
 
****Coordinate plots
 
****Scatterplot matrix
 
****Linked histograms
 
****Mosaic plots
 
****Icons
 
****Object and Attribute Visibility
 
 
 
**3.2    Encoding of relation
 
***Lines
 
***Maps and diagrams
 
****Venn diagrams
 
****InfoCrystal
 
****Cluster Maps
 
***Tree representations
 
****Cone tree
 
****Tree maps
 
**** Hyperbolic browser
 
 
 
**3.3    Support for design
 
***References
 
***Exercises
 
 
 
*Chapter 4  Presentation
 
*A problem
 
*The presentation issue
 
 
 
**4.1      Space limitations
 
***Scrolling
 
***Overview plus detail
 
***Distortion
 
***Application
 
***Generalization
 
***Suppression
 
***Combined distortion and suppression
 
***Historical note
 
***Zoom and Pan
 
 
 
**4.2      Time limitations
 
***Rapid Serial Visual Presentation
 
***Briefly glimpsed images
 
***Space and Time resources
 
***Eye gaze
 
***Presentation modes
 
***Manual control
 
***Models of human visual performance
 
***Interaction design
 
***References
 
***Exercises
 
 
 
*Chapter 5    Interaction
 
**Scenarios
 
**Spaces, interactions and balance of control
 
**This chapter
 
 
 
**5.1      Interaction Framework
 
**5.2      Continuous interaction
 
***Dynamically-triggered ‘pop-out’
 
**5.3      Stepped interaction
 
***Discrete information spaces
 
***Stages of action
 
***Navigation
 
***Sensitivity
 
***Residue
 
***Scent
 
***Where am I?
 
***Path breadcrumbs; Location breadcrumbs
 
***Guidance for design
 
 
 
**5.4      Passive interaction
 
***Static display
 
***Browsing
 
***Moving displays
 
 
 
**5.5      Composite interaction
 
***Influences
 
***The prosection
 
 
 
**5.6      Interaction dynamics
 
***Mental models
 
***Blindness
 
***Change blindness; Inattentional blindness; Design to counteract blindness
 
***Visual momentum
 
 
 
**5.7      Design for interaction
 
***References
 
***Exercises
 
 
 
*Chapter 6    Case studies
 
**Design
 
**The case studies
 
**6.1      Small interactive calendars
 
***Planning your time
 
***Design philosophy
 
***Background
 
***Calendar views
 
***Interactive control
 
***Search
 
***Usability study
 
***Observations
 
***Satisfaction and preference
 
***Usability
 
 
 
**6.2      Selecting one from many
 
***The problem
 
***The task
 
***Existing solutions
 
***Bargrams
 
***Affordances
 
***EZChooser
 
***Sensitivity
 
***Related work
 
***Evaluation
 
***Comment
 
 
 
**6.3      Web browsing through a keyhole
 
***The problem
 
***A solution
 
***The RSVP Browser
 
***System design
 
***Evaluation
 
***Discussion
 
***Comment
 
 
**6.4      Communication analysis
 
***Command and Control
 
***System requirements
 
***The MIND tool
 
***Exploratory analysis
 
***Scenario
 
***Conclusion
 
 
 
**6.5      Archival galaxies
 
***Large collections of documents
 
***Background and requirements
 
***Earlier work
 
***Design decisions
 
***Interaction and search
 
***Layout
 
***Evaluation
 
***Exercises
 
 
 
 
 
*Glossary
 
*Video Clips
 
 
 
 
 
== References ==
 
[Pearson, 2006] Pearson Education, Bookshop: Information Visualization - Design for Interaction, Retrieved at: Dec 4, 2006. http://www.pearsoned.co.uk/Bookshop/detail.asp?item=100000000132840
 
 
 
[[Category:Books]]
 

Latest revision as of 14:36, 31 May 2012

Totally cool visualization. Question:How are the boxes orerded? I am guessing, by gross revenue, but how did you decide whether to order the wider boxes on the bottom and to the right and the tall skinnier ones to the left and at the top?Thanks,Elliot