Difference between revisions of "Spence, R.: Information Visualization - Design for Interaction (2nd Edition), Pearson Education, 2006"

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{{Quotation|Fully revised textbook on the rapidly growing field of Information Visualization. Its emphasis is on real-world examples and applications of computer-generated and interactive visualization.  Information visualization deals with representing concepts and data in a meaningful way. Depending on the medium used, information can be visualized in either static (e.g. a graph on a printed page) or dynamic forms. This book is appropriate for courses in information visualization, human-computer interaction, interaction design, and computer graphics.|[Pearson, 2006]}}
 
{{Quotation|Fully revised textbook on the rapidly growing field of Information Visualization. Its emphasis is on real-world examples and applications of computer-generated and interactive visualization.  Information visualization deals with representing concepts and data in a meaningful way. Depending on the medium used, information can be visualized in either static (e.g. a graph on a printed page) or dynamic forms. This book is appropriate for courses in information visualization, human-computer interaction, interaction design, and computer graphics.|[Pearson, 2006]}}
  
'''''Features instructor resources including PowerPoint files with a wealth of images and diagrams taken from the book, and a collection of useful short video clips'''''
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''Features instructor resources including PowerPoint files with a wealth of images and diagrams taken from the book, and a collection of useful short video clips''
  
  

Revision as of 13:01, 4 December 2006

[Pearson, 2006]

Type: Book/Hardback
Author: Robert Spence
Pages: 304
Publisher: Pearson Education
Publication Date: December 2006

Fully revised textbook on the rapidly growing field of Information Visualization. Its emphasis is on real-world examples and applications of computer-generated and interactive visualization. Information visualization deals with representing concepts and data in a meaningful way. Depending on the medium used, information can be visualized in either static (e.g. a graph on a printed page) or dynamic forms. This book is appropriate for courses in information visualization, human-computer interaction, interaction design, and computer graphics.
[Pearson, 2006]



Features instructor resources including PowerPoint files with a wealth of images and diagrams taken from the book, and a collection of useful short video clips


ISBN 0132065509

Table of Contents

  • Dedication
  • About the author
  • Other books by the author
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgements
  • Chapter 1 What is Visualization?
    • Visualization
    • Computational support
    • The Human User
    • The value of Information Visualization
      • Fraud; silicon chips; pharmaceuticals
    • Questions of Taxonomy
    • Issues
    • References
    • Exercises
  • Chapter 2 The Issues
    • The task
    • Nature of the problem
    • The data
    • Table presentation
    • Bargrams
    • Interactive object selection
    • Overview
    • Multiple attributes
    • Detail
    • Significant objects
    • Interactive attribute selection
    • Space limitations
    • Filtering
    • Taking stock
    • Navigational guidance
    • Movement in information space
    • Perception and interpretation
    • Summary
    • References
    • Exercises
  • Chapter 3 Representation
    • Data types
    • Data complexity
    • Perception and Cognition
    • 3.1 Encoding of value
      • Univariate data
        • A single number; a collection of numbers
      • Bivariate data
      • Trivariate data
        • Scatterplot matrix
        • Preattentive processing- things that ‘pop out’; choice of encoding
      • Hypervariate data
        • Coordinate plots
        • Scatterplot matrix
        • Linked histograms
        • Mosaic plots
        • Icons
        • Object and Attribute Visibility
    • 3.2 Encoding of relation
      • Lines
      • Maps and diagrams
        • Venn diagrams
        • InfoCrystal
        • Cluster Maps
      • Tree representations
        • Cone tree
        • Tree maps
        • Hyperbolic browser
    • 3.3 Support for design
      • References
      • Exercises
  • Chapter 4 Presentation
  • A problem
  • The presentation issue
    • 4.1 Space limitations
      • Scrolling
      • Overview plus detail
      • Distortion
      • Application
      • Generalization
      • Suppression
      • Combined distortion and suppression
      • Historical note
      • Zoom and Pan
    • 4.2 Time limitations
      • Rapid Serial Visual Presentation
      • Briefly glimpsed images
      • Space and Time resources
      • Eye gaze
      • Presentation modes
      • Manual control
      • Models of human visual performance
      • Interaction design
      • References
      • Exercises
  • Chapter 5 Interaction
    • Scenarios
    • Spaces, interactions and balance of control
    • This chapter
    • 5.1 Interaction Framework
    • 5.2 Continuous interaction
      • Dynamically-triggered ‘pop-out’
    • 5.3 Stepped interaction
      • Discrete information spaces
      • Stages of action
      • Navigation
      • Sensitivity
      • Residue
      • Scent
      • Where am I?
      • Path breadcrumbs; Location breadcrumbs
      • Guidance for design
    • 5.4 Passive interaction
      • Static display
      • Browsing
      • Moving displays
    • 5.5 Composite interaction
      • Influences
      • The prosection
    • 5.6 Interaction dynamics
      • Mental models
      • Blindness
      • Change blindness; Inattentional blindness; Design to counteract blindness
      • Visual momentum
    • 5.7 Design for interaction
      • References
      • Exercises
  • Chapter 6 Case studies
    • Design
    • The case studies
    • 6.1 Small interactive calendars
      • Planning your time
      • Design philosophy
      • Background
      • Calendar views
      • Interactive control
      • Search
      • Usability study
      • Observations
      • Satisfaction and preference
      • Usability
    • 6.2 Selecting one from many
      • The problem
      • The task
      • Existing solutions
      • Bargrams
      • Affordances
      • EZChooser
      • Sensitivity
      • Related work
      • Evaluation
      • Comment
    • 6.3 Web browsing through a keyhole
      • The problem
      • A solution
      • The RSVP Browser
      • System design
      • Evaluation
      • Discussion
      • Comment
    • 6.4 Communication analysis
      • Command and Control
      • System requirements
      • The MIND tool
      • Exploratory analysis
      • Scenario
      • Conclusion
    • 6.5 Archival galaxies
      • Large collections of documents
      • Background and requirements
      • Earlier work
      • Design decisions
      • Interaction and search
      • Layout
      • Evaluation
      • Exercises


  • Glossary
  • Video Clips


References

[Pearson, 2006] Pearson Education, Bookshop: Information Visualization - Design for Interaction, Retrieved at: Dec 4, 2006. http://www.pearsoned.co.uk/Bookshop/detail.asp?item=100000000132840