Difference between revisions of "Information"

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{{Quotation|[[Information]], in its earliest historical meaning, corresponds to the act of informing, or to the act of giving form or shape to the mind, according to the Oxford English Dictionary. Inform itself comes (via French) from the Latin verb "informare”, to give form to, to form an idea of.|[Bertini and Lalanne, 2009]}}
 
{{Quotation|[[Information]], in its earliest historical meaning, corresponds to the act of informing, or to the act of giving form or shape to the mind, according to the Oxford English Dictionary. Inform itself comes (via French) from the Latin verb "informare”, to give form to, to form an idea of.|[Bertini and Lalanne, 2009]}}
  
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see [[Knowledge Discovery]] for an explanation of the relationship between [[Data]], [[Information]], [[Insight]], [[Model]], [[Pattern]], [[Hypothesis]], [[Knowledge]] and [[Knowledge Crystallization]].
  
 
see also: [[Data]], [[Information]], [[Knowledge]], [[Wisdom]]
 
see also: [[Data]], [[Information]], [[Knowledge]], [[Wisdom]]

Revision as of 10:47, 21 August 2009

Information is data put within context. It's a concept bound to that of metadata, data that refers to the meaning of other data. For example if in a table of data one of the columns is labeled as "batch number" 07012007, one string in that same column, gets a particular meaning. Information is the distillation of data or data with a meaning, but this still is not knowledge
[Dürsteler, 2007]


Data are observational measurements that have been recorded in some way, whereas information is data that is generalized, ordered and contextualized in ways that give them meaning. Information thus is selective toward data, separating the important from the relatively unimportant.
[Mennis et al., 2000]


Information, in its earliest historical meaning, corresponds to the act of informing, or to the act of giving form or shape to the mind, according to the Oxford English Dictionary. Inform itself comes (via French) from the Latin verb "informare”, to give form to, to form an idea of.
[Bertini and Lalanne, 2009]


see Knowledge Discovery for an explanation of the relationship between Data, Information, Insight, Model, Pattern, Hypothesis, Knowledge and Knowledge Crystallization.

see also: Data, Information, Knowledge, Wisdom

References